System Bonding for Water Slides

Proper pool bonding is incredibly important when it comes to considering the safety of swimmers. Pools require electricity to power certain components that make the pool function. Things like pumps, lights and heaters cannot operate without electricity. When pools and their necessary components are not properly bonded or grounded, some electricity can make its way into the pool and potentially harm swimmers. This is why Counsilman-Hunsaker ensures our standards are up-to-date and in line with National Electric Code (NEC) requirements.

Bonding involves electrically connecting all exposed metallic items not designed to carry electricity as protection from electric shock. What this essentially means is that bonding keeps electricity separate from swimmers. In an improperly-bonded pool, electrical gradients will seek the easiest path for conductivity. Bonded pools make electric currents flow into a grid that disperses them.

The requirement to bond and ground pools and pool equipment is a safety requirement incorporated into the NEC, specifically article 680. Equipotential bonding is intended to reduce the voltage gradients in the area around the pool by use of a common ground bonding grid in accordance with NEC 680.26.

The pool shell reinforcing steel, including at least three-feet of the perimeter deck, and all metal anchors, inserts, fittings, light niches, and equipment in the pool and within five-feet of the pool’s edge, as well as the mechanical equipment in the filter room, must be bonded together per NEC Article 680 to form an equipotential bonding grid. Further, due to the importance of controlling electrical currents in and around the pool, the bonding system should be taken back and connected to a positive, true and adequate ground. The ground should be tested and certified as a condition of acceptance.

The code does not specify with regards to water slide components that are beyond the five-foot perimeter around the pool. Water slides have a variety of components including the fiberglass flume, support structures, and the start tower. The water slide start tower and support structures are typically metal structures and, despite not being in direct contact with the water, must be bonded. The start tower is easily within reach of those entering the water slide start tub, and leaking water slide joints may provide a direct connection to the water slide support structure.  Thus, there is a need to bond these components with the rest of the pool components. Water slide manufacturers typically show these requirements on their engineered documents.

Ultimately, by properly grounding and bonding your pool components, you make your pool safer for everyone to enjoy. Swimmer safety is a top priority for Counsilman-Hunsaker, which is why we take these NEC requirements very seriously and regularly ensure our designs create a safe environment for everyone.

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