Depth Markers and Warning Signs

Depth makers and warning signs are one of the most important aspects of pool design. Depth markers and warning signs allow swimmers on the pool deck, as well as swimmers inside the pool, to know water depth. Knowing if the water is of a safe depth is critical information for swimmers looking to dive in.
In the United States, every state has its own health code with a standard approach on depth markers and warning signs, and how they should be placed in and around the pool. With that being said, Counsilman-Hunsaker implements its own standard when it comes to the layout of depth markers and warning signs on our pool designs. This standard is one that complies with all state health codes in the country, as well as the Model Aquatic Health Code.

Counsilman-Hunsaker’s standard states that all depth markers and warning signs on the deck shall be either slip-resistant tile or epoxy paint. It is expected that pool decks will end up getting wet, and wet tile can be very slippery. The slip-resistant tile and epoxy paint helps to prevent swimmers from taking a spill on the pool deck.
These deck markings should also be in contrasting color to all surrounding field tile. If the deck markings are the same color as the field tile, they can become camouflaged and overlooked. To keep this from happening, we have the contrasting color specification so the water depth number is clearly visible to all swimmers.
Every state has its own spacing requirements as far as depth markers and warning signs go, though the majority require both to be placed every 25 feet. Some states require that depth markers only need to be placed at the shallowest and deepest points and at every break in slope, while there are more stringent state codes that require the depth markers to be placed at the shallowest, deepest, every break in slope, and at every two feet of change in water depth. To keep all 50 states satisfied, we follow the most stringent codes when placing our depth markers. Depth markers are placed every 25 feet, at the shallowest and deepest water depth, at every break in slope, and at every two-foot change in water depth. Warning signs are also placed every 25 feet from the five-foot break to the shallowest point of the pool. The only thing left for us to do is adjust the placement from 25 feet to 20 feet depending on the local state code for the state we are working in.
As for the “No Diving” warning signs, 49 states require them to be placed from the five-foot break back to the shallowest water depth of the pool. New York is the only state that requires the warning signs to be placed from the eight-foot water depth back to the shallowest water depth.
Being aware of the various restrictions associated with depth markers and warning signs is vital to ensuring the safety of pool-goers everywhere.

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