Category Archives: Research

Almost Half Of Americans Are Afraid Of The Deep End Of A Pool.

Two-thirds of Americans are afraid of deep water in lakes, rivers, and oceans

A study performed by Gallup (n-815) and presented at the 2008 World Aquatic Health Conference (Melon Dash) indicates that 64% of Americans are afraid in the deep, open water (lakes, rivers, oceans, etc.)  Forty-six percent are afraid in deep water in pools.  Even 39% are afraid to put their heads under water.  It seems reasonable to surmise that if an individual is afraid of a specific environment, it is less likely that the individual would advocate participating in activities in that environment.  If that individual has influence of family purchasing decisions, it is reasonable to conclude that over half of American households may oppose the idea of engaging in aquatic activities.

People don’t think about “strokes” when they think they are going to die

Overcoming change is a substantial barrier for most people.  Overcoming fear is even a greater obstacle.  Gallup research suggests that almost half of American adults fear deep water.  Most learn-to-swim programs focus on children and development of the ability to perform a variety of swim strokes.  The marketing of learn-to-swim programs may not connect to this large market segment.  As a result, in it important to explore and support programs that are tailored to the fearful adult.

The above data was shared at the Learn-To-Swim Innovator Meeting in Colorado Springs Colorado on April 25, 2012.  This meeting was sponsored by the National Swimming Pool Foundation

 

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Swimming Is The Top “Aspirational Activity” For Kids And Seniors

The Sporting Good Manufacturing Association partners with five other organizations to ascertain activity popularity. In 2011, they measured the activity of different age groups hope or wish to do (aspirational activity) for seven age groups ranging from six to 65+ years of age. “Swimming for fitness” was in the top three aspirational activities for EVERY age group. In fact, “swimming for fitness” was the leading aspirational activity for the 6-12 and the 65+ age groups. US census data suggests that the 65+ age group will increase from about 39.5 million  July 1, 2009) to about $88.5 million (2050),  according to the US Census Bureau. This finding demonstrates there is substantial interest throughout the population.

The above data was shared at the Learn-To-Swim Innovator Meeting in Colorado Springs Colorado on April 25, 2012. This meeting was sponsored by the National Swimming Pool Foundation.

Swimmers Have A Lower Mortality Rate Than Runners And Walkers

It is universally-accepted that physical activity is good for your health and reduces mortality rates. Studies that compare mortality rates between swimmers and other common physical activities are rare. The most compelling findings are those  of Chase, Sui, & Blair (IJARE, 2008, 2(3), 213-223)  that compared 40,517  men  20-90 years who completed health examinations from 1971-2003 as part  of the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study administered by the Cooper Institute.  After adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, and family history of cardiovascular disease, swimmers had a 50% and 49% lower all-cause morality risk than did men who were walkers or runners.

The above data was shared at the Learn-To-Swim Innovator Meeting in Colorado Springs Colorado on April 25, 2012.  This meeting was sponsored by the National Swimming Pool Foundation.

 

 

UV and Chlorine Water Disinfection Research

Purdue University, was awarded a grant of $75,000 as the first step in a three-year program to research combined UV and chlorine swimming pool water disinfection methods. The research will examine the effects of combined treatment on water and air chemistry in chlorinated, indoor pool settings.  The grant, managed and administered under the NSPF industrial research grants category.  The goal of this work is to give industry, regulators, facility operators and management a better understanding of swimming pool disinfection byproduct chemistry and technology options for their control, including Cryptosporidium inactivation. In turn this information will be helpful in reducing human exposure to DBPs in recreational water facilities.

 

National Swimming Pool Foundation Grants

The NSPF mission statement is: To enhance healthy living by increasing aquatic activity through education and research.  In support of this mission, the board has awarded four grants totaling $180,995. One health benefit grant was awarded to Utah State University and three injury prevention grants were awarded to University of Arizona, Purdue University, and the University North Carolina-Charlotte (UNCC). These grants will sustain ongoing research supported by NSPF in recent years and embark on new research.  The board maintains its’ commitment to encourage increased aquatic activity through funding evidence-based research. “We refuse to allow the economy to deter us from promoting aquatics,” remarked Bill Kent, retiring Chairman of the NSPF Grant Review Committee.  “The science eliminates the bad things and discovers the good things that show how getting in water benefits humankind,” he added.