Category Archives: Regulation

Model Aquatic Health Code “Knitted” Version Released for Final Round of Public Comments

March 28, 2014

MAHC milestone reached!

Today marks an important milestone in the development of the MAHC, the nation’s first science-based model guidance for swimming pools and other aquatic venues. The first complete “knitted” version of the MAHC has now been released for the MAHC’s second of two 60-day rounds of public comments. This knitted version blends together the 14 modules that have been developed, opened for public comment, and revised based on your feedback.

Be a part of history—send us your comments

Are you an environmental or other public health professional, aquatics facility designer or operator, scientist specializing in waterborne disease or injury prevention, other professional, or a member of the general public interested in protecting and advancing public health at aquatic venues? If so, you are invited to review this version of the MAHC and submit your comments by May 27, 2014.

Spread the word

Please remind your colleagues that this complete, knitted version of the MAHC is now open for public comment. We encourage you to forward this email and/or to use your social media channels to spread the word. You may use, edit, or customize the following sample posts for use on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc.:

  • Submit      comments on first complete “knitted” version of Model Aquatic Health Code      released today. Deadline 5/27. http://go.usa.gov/Kfex
  • Be part      of history! Submit comments on 1st complete national      science-based code for swimming pools. http://go.usa.gov/Kfex
  • First      complete “knitted” version of Model Aquatic Health Code released for      public comment. Submit comments by 5/27 http://go.usa.gov/Kfex

Thank you for your review! We look forward to your comments. We will revise the knitted version of the MAHC based on the comments we receive and are excited to release the MAHC 1st Edition in summer 2014.

All Stories

Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) Review

Many people have been asking:

What is the current status of the MAHC and what is the best web site address to hit to see the current status of the modules for comments?

Here’s a link to the CDC’s webpage so you can check the status on each module.

http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/pools/mahc/structure-content/index.html

Here’s a list of what we know has happened so far

Disinfection Water Quality:        Second Post after public comment 1/24/14

Regulatory Module:                      Second Post after public comment 1/24/14

Facility and Design:                      Second Post after public comment 12/16/13

Risk Management                         Second Post after public comment 7/23/13

Facility Maintenance                    Second Post after public comment 7/2/13

Monitor and Testing                     Second Post after public comment 6/05/13

Contamination Burden                Second Post after public comment 6/05/13

Fecal Contamination                    Second Post after public comment 5/30/13

Operator Training                         Second Post after public comment 04/08/11

Preface                                             Second Post after public comment 11/10/11

Recirculation/Filter System        First Post 7/02/13  They have not posted public comment or reposted after update.

Ventilation                                      First Post 4/13/11  They have not posted public comment or reposted after update.

 

Don’t forget to get your comments in!

Revised MAHC Modules Posted: Disinfection & Water Quality, Regulatory

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent this bulletin on 1/24/2014

Model Aquatic Health Code

Thank you for your interest in the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC), a collaborative effort of public health, academia, and industry working to protect individuals, families, and communities from preventable waterborne diseases and injuries through evidence-based guidance. Read below for the latest information.

New

The Disinfection and Water Quality Module and the Regulatory Module have been revised and re-posted after the first public comment period. View the revised modules and the response to comments documents.

Reminders

The first full version of the MAHC is coming soon, and we want your feedback! We plan to release the first full version of the MAHC—a combination of all revised modules and supplemental information—in spring 2014 for a 60-day public comment period.

Get a head start!

Because the MAHC will be a long document, we encourage you to get a head start and begin compiling your comments now on the modules that have been revised after the first public comment period so that you have plenty of time to submit your feedback. The content of these modules will not change substantially, but we will have to reorganize information that may be duplicated in multiple modules and resolve conflicts where duplicate items make different recommendations. We will announce when the full version is posted and we are accepting public comments for 60 days.

Each module has a short synopsis or abstract highlighting the most critical recommendations.

You can monitor the status of all modules on the MAHC website.

IT’S NOT LIKE RIDING A BIKE

I ThinkImagine that during a triathlon, a cyclist wrecked in the middle of the road, and everyone just stood around saying, “Poor guy.  Dude must have had a heart attack.  Or maybe he wasn’t all that good on a bike.  Nothing we can do now.” 

Sound ridiculous?  Most people understand that just because a person knows how to ride a bike, that’s not a guarantee that s/he will never fall off of it, nor get seriously hurt, nor even die.  Accidents happen.  And when they do, people notice.  And help.

With many a triathlon swim course, however, there is often a foregone conclusion that nothing can be done for accidents that occur in the water.  Recently a race director remarked about distress cases in the swim, “It’s not like you can drive an ambulance up to the athlete.”

For the cycling portion, USA Triathlon has helmet requirements and other rules to minimize life-threatening injuries on the bike course.  Many of those measures have come from experts in the field of cycling.  Yet, too often missing from the swim course are experts from the field of aquatic safety, the people trained to notice, as well as to advise on other swim precautions. 

Lifeguards discern the subtle changes in body position and behavior that indicate distress, or a more serious medical event in progress or imminent.  In pre-incident radio chatter, water rescuers say things like “head-up breaststroker coming your way, lifeguard six” and “pink cap on her back trying to unzip her wetsuit” and “yellow cap, number 1277, holding a kayak for the second time”, just a few of the precursors to and signs of swimming distress that lifeguards not only notice, but monitor closely to anticipate where the need to respond quickly may arise. 

As early as childhood, we learn that no one is ever drown-proof.  (Until recently, drowning was defined as any death that occurs within 24 hours of a submersion event.)  We are told to swim near a lifeguard, and that water safety requires different “layers” of protection.  Like riding a bike, just knowing how to swim is not a guarantee against in-water distress.  Even the most qualified swimmers, taking every precaution, are not exempt.  Yet, increasingly pervading triathlon culture is the disturbing concept that triathletes are tough, and shouldn’t NEED a lifeguard.0714Reef540

Yet unlike the land under a bike path, water is a different element.  It is big.  It can be quiet or deafening.  It resists, or rushes.  It can lift up, or swallow up.  It hides.  A swim path isn’t lined with spectators.  Even if it were, it’s not likely that any one of those cheering fans would detect something wrong, or be able to render the kind of aid that may be necessary.  Constant skilled supervision is required to spot the often vague and hazy signs of concern.  And a specific competence is demanded for rescue in that environment.

Insist on certified lifeguards at triathlons and open-water swim events. 

Because it’s not like riding a bike.

 

Revised MAHC Module Posted: Facility Design and Construction

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent this bulletin at 12/16/2013 04:05 PM EST

Model Aquatic Health Code

December 16, 2013

Thank you for your interest in the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC), a collaborative effort of public health, academia, and industry working to protect individuals, families, and communities from preventable waterborne diseases and injuries through evidence-based guidance. Read below for the latest information.

New

The Facility Design and Construction Module has been revised and re-posted after the first public comment period. View the revised module and the response to comments document.

Reminders

Each module has a short synopsis or abstract highlighting the most critical recommendations.

You can monitor the status of all modules on the MAHC website.