Category Archives: Programming

Water Basketball Goals

Water basketball can occasionally become an afterthought during the commercial swimming pool design process due to its relatively low startup and maintenance costs. Furthermore, water basketball goals can be accommodated in a variety of places across a typical leisure pool and are hindered by the available water depth more than the available space. Often times, they are placed somewhere in the lap lane area of a pool because the larger amenities such as play structures, current channels, and water slides demand specific water depth and clearance requirements that don’t align with the ideal conditions for water basketball. Counsilman-Hunsaker has recognized a need to consider water basketball during the schematic design phase of a project with the type of water basketball goal specified becoming a function of the pool overflow system (gutter vs. skimmer), the ability to move the goal, and the desire to have an adjustable height goal. Each type of water basketball goal has its advantages and disadvantages that will be further discussed.

 

During initial phases of the design of a swimming pool, a “water basketball nook” should be considered accompanied by an on-looking underwater bench. By designating a confined area of the pool to water basketball, design teams can help mitigate un-desired interactions between calmer portions of the swimming pool and the unavoidable, yet popular, rowdy water basketball game. That being said, the type of water basketball goal to be specified for the pool contractor is determined by the pool overflow system. Water basketball goals have ideal setback distances from edge of the pool to the water basketball goal anchor. For example, SR Smith manufactures a water basketball goal known as the Swim N’ Dunk (S-BASK-ERS) with a setback distance of 18 inches. This smaller setback limits the type of pool that this particular goal can be installed on to skimmer pools. Obviously, the type of overflow system should not be a slave to the type of water basketball goal specified; however, it is important to keep these ideas in mind when discussing potential designs with a facility owner.

Figure 1: SR Smith Swim N’ Dunk Water Basketball Goal

 

Fortunately, SR Smith makes an extended reach model of the water basketball goal previously mentioned that increases the setback distance from the pool edge to 30 inches. The extended reach model could be used on a pool with a gutter perimeter overflow system, but it still lacks adjustability. The Spectrum Adjustable Basketball Hoop allows for the height of the water basketball goal to be raised and lowered. The Spectrum system uses a compression mechanism and two extension arms to do this. The setback distance for this goal is 26 inches and could be specified for a pool with a gutter system. Designers should keep this mechanism in mind when accounting for the surrounding deck space as the lever used to adjust the goal can have a large swing radius. It is important to note that any water basketball goal with an adjustable height should have a safety stopper to prevent the backboard from falling from its highest point. Without this safety implementation, backboards have been known to come crashing down on the coping stone below with some force.

Figure 2: Spectrum Adjustable Basketball Hoop

 

Both of the water basketball goals mentioned thus far have a fixed position. More specifically, they are anchored to the pool deck and, while they can be removed and stored, will more or less be there permanently.  Dunn-Rite, Inc. has a model known as the Splash and Slam that is both movable and has an adjustable height. The base of the water basketball goal is a hollowed polyethylene basin that weighs 500 pounds when filled with water. The water can then be drained to allow pool operators to move the goal. The backboard height can also be adjusted and leveled to compensate for the occasional uneven pool deck. This goal, while it has its advantages, would typically be specified if water basketball was considered as an afterthought during design. It is customizable, but lacks aesthetically and in sturdiness when compared to the fixed position goals.

Figure 3: Dunn Rite Splash and Slam

 

Water basketball goals should be a staple when it comes to leisure pool design because of their sheer popularity and low startup and upkeep cost. Ideally, the goal is placed in an area of the pool far away from where younger children will be playing and adults will be lounging. Different perimeter overflow systems demand different types of goals as fixed goals need to be provided with a deck mounted anchor. If all of these considerations are taken into account during the design phase of a project, water basketball can become the primary feature of a facility. They do bring with them many liability issues, but that is a topic for another discussion.

 

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COOL Programming

USA Swimming’s Facilities Development Department recommends all “new models” for aquatic facilities have at least two pools with one having water temperature 80 to 84 degrees (cool water and generally the competition or training pool) and the other pool having water temperatures of 87 to 89 degrees (warm water). However, we are very interested in improving the financial sustainability of many existing single-pool facilities. This article will help you with programming options in the cooler temperature pool (training pool).
Most deep water will be on the cooler side; 82 degrees and under. Deep-water exercise is perfect for nearly every population and provides variety, intensity, challenge, fun, and is impact free. Who can work in cooler water and possibly deep water?
Target Audiences for Deep-Water Exercise

  • All able body and special populations (see below)
  • MS could be vertical or horizontal
  • Obese or overweight
  • Prenatal
  • High Performance (competitive swimmers and tri-athletes)
  • Fitness Swimmers
  • Master Swimmers

Recommended workout formats for deep-water exercise include:

  • High Intensity (HIT) OR (HITT) High Intensity Interval Training
  • Deep water running / cross training
  • HI-YO Intervals
  • Cross Country Ski Series
  • Cycling / noodle / board / belt
  • In Deep with Pilates (must know what you are doing)
  • Deep Water Therapy
  • Deep Technique
  • Water Polo Gym

To learn about the above different types of exercises it is recommended to attend workshops and conferences held by the Aquatic Exercise Association (AEA).www.aeawave.com (http://www.aeawave.com/)

Small group training

This cost effective way to offer personalized exercise to people in your community offers multiple benefits for your facility, staff and customers. Potential benefits include:

  • Facility = Increase member retention, capture a new revenue stream, and use the pool during down times. All outcomes improve the facility’s bottom line.
  • Personal trainer / Swim Coach = Job diversity, the ability to earn more per hour and the potential to serve more people.
  • Customer = Personalized results with the support of a group at a lower cost than traditional one-on-one personal
  • training/coaching.

For all of these reasons, the value of small group training is clear. So now the question is, how do you establish small group training
programs? The inclusion of programming that offers both fitness and health benefits may be the right solution.

Step 1: Understanding the Fitness & Health Connection

An exercise program that offers both fitness and health benefits can be the difference between a person making a behavioral life change or reverting to old habits. There are components of fitness considered essential in improving physical health:

  • Cardio-respiratory endurance
  • Muscle strength and endurance
  • Flexibility and body composition

Health benefits might be thought of as a combination of physical, mental and social well-being. These parameters are not easily evaluated in a traditional analysis process however they are the key to making exercise personal.
Certification for fitness trainers places a strong emphasis on anatomy, kinesiology, and exercise physiology. Having a solid
understanding of these areas prepares the trainer from a scientific perspective to design sound exercise programs for fitness benefits. To develop and lead programming that has the potential to truly change how a person moves and feels requires consideration of the physical and biological and the behavioral sciences. Small group training that focuses on always including these three sciences offers the complete package. They make exercise personally relevant and rewarding.

Step 2: Hire leaders with the right skill set 

To effectively lead, the coach must use a balanced approach between the science and art of movement. Here are some important skills and qualifications that make a good water exercise coach.

  • Certified personal trainer
  • Certified aquatic fitness professional
  • Critical thinker
  • Knowledge specific to intended target audience beyond basic certification
  • Able to motivate group
  • Capable of cueing to a group, observing results, and providing follow up cues
  • Engaging
  • Able to multi-task and think ahead
  • Creating and implementing a season exercise plan

Step 3: Develop a program that delivers results
It is important to educate the community on how your program is different and its benefits. Here are some ideas to help develop a program that differentiates and elevates you in your community.

1. Offer small group training to a specific audience. This has several benefits from bringing together people who share similar experiences/life challenges while allowing the coach to design a program that uses exercises and techniques specific to the group. This will also offer the opportunity for socialization and being able to “fit in” with others like themselves.

Target classes may include:

  • Gentle moves to ease arthritis pain
  • Exercise for healthy knees & hips
  • Intervals for weight loss

2. Provide options for all fitness levels. Small group training can be designed for all ages and fitness levels from low impact to high performance. Small group training fills the gap between therapy and fitness. Once you have selected your audience it is time to determine the training format and what depth of the pool would be best; shallow (3’6” to 4’6”) or deep (5’ and deeper). One of the most important programming considerations is water temperature. Specific formats like Yoga or Ai Chi for fall prevention, or goal oriented formats such as circuit training for improved knee strength and balance are popular. Developing exercise programs for high performance and cross training would be for your clients who struggle with continuous training on land. They can train in the water a few times a week or more and still compete and do some properly designed training on land.
Knowing your clientele is critical to formulating a workout with responsible design. As a professional, due diligence is required which includes being familiar with current research, attending continuing education workshops and, if applicable, knowing the individual client precautions. For the particular group you are servicing, you need to know what muscles need to be strengthened or stretched, what skills need to be addressed, what time of day might be best for the audience to exercise, and what social and emotional needs are common. Environmental factors should also be considered, including pool entry/exit, getting to and from the changing facilities, and what client “fears” might be potential barriers.

Springboard Diving

As a full-service aquatic consulting firm, we strive to design facilities that meet the needs of all user groups. While many aquatic sport facilities revolve around competitive swimming, we certainly do not want to neglect diving. While most university and high school teams only have 5-10 divers on their roster, they can be a secret weapon to propel a team over the competition. For instance, Purdue University finished in 13th place at the 2017 NCAA Championships with a final score of 106.5. The Boilermakers, Purdue’s diving team, scored 94.5 of the total 106.5 score for Purdue. Without the diving team, Purdue would have finished tied for 32nd place. Clearly, consideration should be given to a facility’s diving amenities.

Coincidentally, Purdue has one of the premier diving training facilities in the country, which includes a separate warm water diving pool with a massive 1-meter, 3-meter, 5-meter, 7.5-meter, and 10-meter diving tower. This facility has even attracted athletes like Olympic platform diving medalists Steele Johnson and David Boudia to train and compete at the university. While not every facility has the capacity or need for a platform as elaborate as Purdue’s, there are subtle ways to make your facility stand out when it comes to springboard diving.

There are two ways to mount a 1-meter or 3-meter springboard: on a stand or on a concrete platform. We tend to see a prefabricated, manufactured stand more often than anything else. These stands are made of heavy-duty aluminum and anchored to the deck using bronze deck anchors. The stands include handrails on both sides, as well as a ladder at the rear end of the board.

Shelby Bartlett, the four-time NCAA Zone qualifier and recently-appointed head diving coach at Saginaw Valley State University said that she prefers concrete platforms.

“They provide a more stable surface. Manufactured stands sometimes tend to shake, especially if they are older. And if the hand railings extend past the fulcrum, you can sometimes hit your hand on your walk down the board,” said Bartlett.

While manufactured stands are a good solution for low-level competition, Counsilman-Hunsaker has found that most high-level competitors prefer the more permanent solution that concrete platforms provide. These platforms also tend to be safer to travel up and down on.

Concrete platforms can be customized depending on the number and type of boards needed. Typically, we recommend providing two of each type of board to allow for multiple divers to practice simultaneously. Reinforcement for concrete platforms is designed by a structural engineer and is tested under both static and dynamic loads. A manufactured short stand is mounted to the concrete platform using bronze anchors and can come with or without handrails. If owners would prefer no handrails, they can be moved to surround the outside concrete platform to provide additional security on the elevated surface. This eliminates the risk of hands hitting the rails during divers’ approaches. In some jurisdictions, the concrete stairs leading to platforms fall under the design requirements of the International Building Code (IBC), which states that a maximum riser height for stairs is 7” with a maximum tread width of 11”. Both measurements are lower than that of most codes.

Counsilman-Hunsaker’s designed concrete stands have two intermediate steps bridging the elevation difference from the deck to the top of the one meter diving board surface.  There is a 10” riser difference between the deck and the first step, as well as between the first and second steps.  Between the second step and the top of the diving board, there is a 19-3/8” difference. Also, each step only has a “tread” depth of 4-3/8” at the deepest point.

While manufactured stands do not fall under the IBC, Counsilman Hunsaker can design custom stands to fit the gutter profile and meet requirements to provide a safer springboard experience.

Being leaders in aquatic design means presenting clients with all of their aquatic sport facility options. Determining the right diving amenities for you is just one of the many decisions we help make during the programming phase of design. Counsilman-Hunsaker has the tools to help guide your aquatic design to meet all user group needs.

Planning a Special Event? What to Consider

Facility members and special events are two aspects of aquatic centers that are sometimes at odds with each other. Special events can bring in new people, have a positive impact on the community and provide marketing for the facility. However, special events can also disrupt your members and daily users, and act as a drain on resources. It’s necessary to be able to balance the two in a way that will provide the greatest impact with the least stress for members.

Members and daily guests are the lifeblood of any facility. The vast majority of your facility’s revenue should come from these two sources. So if these two user groups start reacting negatively to your facility, you can have a major problem on your hands. Members and guests are also the ones that you typically have daily interactions with. You develop trust and build relationships with them, and they can provide insight into how the facility is doing. They’re more likely to tell their friends about your facility, as they have a vested interest, and want it to succeed almost as much as you do. These user groups are valuable assets for facility managers.

100_6370Special events can leave an impact on your facility in a number of positive ways. Typically, special events are fun and draw outside interest from those who may not frequent your facility. This increased interest can get your name out to the masses in a way normal programming can’t. They can also have positive impacts on your normal programming. Special events tend to have large captive audiences; this is a great opportunity to market your programs like swim lessons, fitness classes, health and safety classes, etc. to a new audience.

However, special events have their own set of challenges. Typically, they won’t be big money makers for your facility. Usually, there are high staff costs for special events to make sure everything runs smoothly, as well as special costs for additional supplies. These can range from relatively inexpensive trinkets and take homes for patrons, to large items like movie screen rentals and licensing fees. Increased costs are usually matched with low price points for admission. Depending on the size of the facility, a full house may still not be enough to break even.

Special events can also be frustrating for members and daily users. Portions of, if not the entire, facility will need to be closed for events. Special events are also typically held during peak hours when the majority of your members would use your facility. This, coupled with larger-than-normal crowds, can be a real turn-off for members and guests.

The key to special events is ensuring there is a balance between accommodating your key users and the special event attendees. Try to plan special events on off hours, or non-peak hours. Hold rentals and events after the facility would normally close or before it would open. Or, try to plan events during times that you see low attendance. It could not only lessen some of the hassle on you, but also provide you with increased attendance at a traditionally low time. Try to emphasize quality over quantity. Members are less likely to be irritated by special events when those distractions are minimized.

Lastly, make sure any special event you schedule is going to bring benefit to your facility. Rentals for swim meets or party rooms typically have minimal staff costs and large profit margins. Special events that bring in a large crowds are great to quickly increase your facility impressions. Make every impression count by creating feel-good moments with events that will have a positive impact on the community.

You’re Not Alone! Facing and Fixing Today’s Aquatic Challenges

As the president of the North Texas Aquatics Association, I recently surveyed our membership of aquatics’ professionals in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, as well as some of my colleagues on the World Waterpark Association’s Public Sector Committee, in order to find out what challenges and obstacles they currently face.  As the results came in, I quickly realized that the majority of the challenges mentioned fell into one of three categories: Personnel, Financial and Facility.  And while none of the answers surprised me, it was interesting to see the challenges they face and how it affects them and their organization.

Staffing issues top the list of challenges, mainly because of the nature of the positionsCapture and hours offered to prospective employees.  Operators need staff from 5am to 10pm Monday through Friday, and most the day on the weekends too.  Not only that, sometimes staff is only needed for a few hours at a time (programming, noon lap swim, etc.) and it’s difficult to find dedicated and engaged employees who want to work a staggered schedule.  Because of this, employee turnover and competition from other less stringent jobs stood out as primary challenges posed to the group I surveyed.  Throw in the lack of buy-in from younger employees, and the complexities with recruiting, training and motivating staff, and aquatic professionals have a difficult task ahead of them, and we haven’t even gotten past the first category!

On the financial side, challenges included the rising costs of equipment, supplies and labor, something I noticed over the course of my days as a public sector operator.  From 2007 to 2014, the cost of my calcium hypochlorite went from $166.00 for 100 pounds to $193.00, that’s a 14% increase during times of shrinking budgets. Couple rising costs with aquatics’ staff being given unrealistic cost recovery goals for their facility and the decrease of annual operational budgets, they quickly become frustrated because they must generate more revenue, with less resources to do so.

On the facility side, operators struggle with maintaining aging facilities at an acceptable level, while not having the financial means to make it happen.  Aging pools built in the 1970s and 1980s face physical (aging infrastructure) and functional (lack of features) obsolescence.    These facilities have low attendance because which puts revenue generation at an all-time low, yet their costs keep rising.  Add in changing codes and legislation and now operators are being asked to patch their 40 year old pool to get it into compliance, when it needs a complete renovation.

Now, that we have a list of chalI Thinklenges that hinder aquatics’ professionals, let’s develop a framework to start tackling these one by one.  Anytime I look at overcoming a challenge, I asked myself four questions in regards to that specific challenge.

1)      What difficulties does this challenge pose?

2)      How does it affect my organization and operation?

3)      What are the benefits of overcoming this challenge?

4)      How do I overcome it?

Answering the above questions will make the path to conquering your challenges much easier and will provide you with clear direction and purpose.  Let’s take training and motivating staff as an example and then I’ll send you on your way to tackle the rest.

1)      What difficulties does this challenge pose?

Aquatic operators lack the time and resources to fully train their staff, primarily because they have so many other responsibilities.  Recruiting, hiring, programming, payroll and maintenance all take time and which leaves little time for training. Lack of funding also impacts training and motivation because training funds typically go first when budgets get slashed.

2)      How does it affect my organization and operation?

The lack of training and motivation means that operators receive poor employee behaviors which can put your guests at risk, as well as providing them poor service.  Without training, employees are less likely to buy in to the vision and culture of your organization, which means they leave sooner and operators have a high employee turnover rate.  That puts you back at square one which means less time to train and motivate because must spend time recruiting and hiring.

3)      What are the benefits of overcoming this challenge?

The benefits of training and motivating staff far outweigh the time and resources it takes because once you start training then you can become more efficient in your time management.  You can delegate some of your responsibilities to your more proficient staff and the good behaviors starts to flow from your team. You now have a safer facility with employees who provide better overall service.  They start buying in to your philosophy and vision and now they stay longer, which reduces your turnover and gives you more time to focus on improving your operation, instead of just getting by.

4)      How do I overcome it?

This is probably the toughest question to answer when looking at overcoming the challenge of training and motivating staff, but it’s also the most important.  Operators should create a training calendar that covers all of the topics that need addressing on a daily, weekly or monthly basis with each of their levels of employees.  Once complete, you must show the importance of training in order to achieve your organization’s vision (don’t forget to make attendance mandatory!).  Also, make sure you hire hiring individuals who have shared values with your philosophy, a positive attitude, internal motivation and great communication skills.  These are the ones that are easy to train!  I might take a little more work upfront during the hiring process, but you’ll be glad you did.  Training is merely an extension of the hiring process so it’s important to show organizational purpose and vision in the interview, as well as every day on the job.  Lay out your expectations on the front-end of employment, communicating to them what to do, how to do it and why it matters.  Buy-in, loyalty, staff retention and employee engagement await around the corner!

Overcoming challenges and obstacles can prove to be a difficult process, but a worthwhile one.  Improving your operation just a little at a time will have big rewards for the future and set your organization up for success for many years to come.