Category Archives: Industry Mentions

Tom Saldarelli To Work With Spectrum Aquatics and Colorado Time Systems

Spectrum Aquatics and Colorado Time Systems have announced the addition of industry expert Tom Saldarelli to their staff.  Tom brings to the company more than 30 years of experience in the aquatics industry.

“All of us are excited to have Tom on board.  His depth of knowledge and solid background in strategic business growth will further contribute to our success as a company,” said Tim Sudeith, Corporate Vice President at PlayCore and General Manager of Spectrum Aquatics and Colorado Time Systems.  Saldarelli has earned degrees in engineering and management and is an aquatics veteran having held previous positions as President of KDI Paragon/Paragon Aquatics & Poolsaver, Chief Operating Officer of RehaMed International  and Vice President of Lawson Aquatics.  He has a successful track record of profitably growing businesses through commitment to creating thoughtful and affordable products and programs.   Recent industry accolades include being named an Aquatics International Power 25 honoree and United States Water Fitness Association’s Who’s Who in Aquatic Leadership.

Saldarelli served as chairman of APSP’s Commercial Segment Council and currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of Aquatics International, the Technical Board of Colorado Time Systems and the Board of Directors of the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

 

 

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Trainer speaks of the ‘Phelps performance legacy’ for aquatic sports

Michael Phelps’ personal athletic trainer believes the American swimmer’s scintillating performances in the pool have helped to transform aquatics forever.

Keenan Robinson has been credited with being part of the team that helped to mould Phelps into the greatest swimmer of all time

Robinson, who has helped to oversee Phelps’ development at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, believes the 18-time Olympic gold medal-winner has raised the performance levels of swimmers for years to come, even though the star is retiring from competitive action after becoming the most decorated Olympian of all time.

“Without a doubt Mike accomplished what he initially set out to do – he changed the sport of swimming,” Robinson said.

“I could write a book on the various ways he changed swimming. He demonstrated that there are no limits on what swimmers can do in performance, both in practice and in meets.

“He made swimmers household names by attracting media outlets and television coverage for more than just the Olympic Games.

“Through his foundation, he is bringing swimming as a sport to people that had previously never had that opportunity, like the Boys’ and Girls’ Club.

“I think what Mike and [Phelps’ coach] Bob Bowman have done in terms of training philosophies, long-term planning for success, how to have peak performances at the biggest meet, has improved swimming internationally.”

Phelps was not the only Team USA star in the pool at the London Olympics, though, with numerous established performers and newcomers taking the world by storm.

So what is the secret of the seemingly never-ending conveyer belt of talent? For Robinson, the answer is simple.

“Work,” he said. “Hands down, you look at the seasoned veterans who won medals – Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Tyler Clary, Rebecca Soni, Allison Schmitt, Dana Vollmer and others – and what they did in their developmental years and continued through to this point and time in their career, and parallel that to what Katie Ledecky and Missy Franklin are doing now, and odds are its something similar in terms of work capacity and work ethic.

“I think the country should be head over heels ecstatic with the swimmers’ performances, especially when you look at the relay performances and take into consideration how many of those swimmers were first-timers. This team performed at the highest level possible.”

Robinson is also glowing in his praise of his coaching colleagues at USA Swimming.

“I think USA Swimming is in an excellent place,” he added. “Women’s swimming coach Teri McKeever and Gregg Troy, head coach of the US men’s team, did an impeccable, Hall Of Fame-worthy job of guiding this team; a blueprint for success, so to speak.

“I think it will be sad to see a legendary coach like Jon Urbanchek retire – 10 Olympics and I believe a gold medallist in every one – but he has done such an unbelievable job of passing his coaching philosophy down to so many coaches. The USA will continue to develop and reach new levels in terms of times and performances.

“That being said, the retirement of Michael Phelps closes a book on the ‘greatest ever’, hands down. His ability to raise the talent around him to another level will be tough to replace.”

With more countries than ever before claiming medals in aquatic sports at the London 2012 Games, Robinson is also aware that the rest of the world is determined to improve its performance levels to challenge in the pool.

The issue of global performance development will be a key talking point at this year’s FINA World Aquatics Convention, which will take place in Moscow from October 29 to November 1.

“There has been a noticeable improvement [around the world] and I commend so many coaches from those countries for working hard at their trade and reaping the benefits of those long hours of developing, training and planning,” Robinson continued.

“I think Bob Bowman and Jon Urbanchek said it to me best towards the end of this year’s Olympic Games over breakfast as they reviewed and began planning for the future. They said that the competition level has improved dramatically.

“Even in Athens at the 2004 Games it did not tax the swimmers’ energy systems as much in preliminaries and semi-finals because the talent level was nowhere near what the US swimmers could produce.

“Eight years’ later, and we even saw this at our own trials, you have to go near your best time or better right from prelims if you want to make the US team and then medal.

“I absolutely see this trend continuing. All US colleges are training the best international talent which improves foreign performances, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see other US coaches following the Dennis Cottrel model for training professional international groups.”

Cottrel is an Australian coach who helped China’s Sun Yang to gold medals in the 400m freestyle and 1,500m freestyle at London 2012.

As Robinson, and aquatics trainers across the world will appreciate, high-performance training now has a truly global outlook.

As Published By FINA

NSPF Awards $17,000 in Scholorships to Nine Students

Nine university students have been awarded a total of $17,000 in Scholarships and Fellowships by the National Swimming Pool Foundation® (NSPF®) Board of Directors for the year 2012-­2013. The board has funded these two award programs annually, now entering their ninth year. As the economy continues to be soft, and educational funding programs continue to be reduced, the NSPF board is pleased to help empower these nine students in their professional development.

National Swimming Pool Foundation’s Certified Pool/Spa Operator® (CPO®) certification graduates and their family members are recognized with the Scholarship Program to help them pursue their college dreams. Providing fellowship assistance to young researchers also helps young scholars as they chart their careers. “There are few things we do any given day that will have an impact for decades. Giving to students to help them on their way is one such thing,” reinforces Bill Kent, NSPF Scholarship Review Committee Chair.

This year’s scholarship applicants were asked to write an essay that discusses how to prevent pool water contamination, and methods to clean up after a contamination incident occurs. The Scholarship Committee approved $9,000 in scholarships to seven students who are pursuing higher education around the U.S., in a variety of subject areas. Laura Glass — Bethel College, received an NSPF Board of Directors Scholarship for $2,000; Joseph Franceschini — University of Las Vegas, was awarded an NSPF Board of Directors Scholarship for $2,000; James Chafins – Kentucky Christian University, received the P. Cory Willis Scholarship for $1,000; Brenda Broderick— Barry University, was recipient of the Phillip J. Sperber Scholarship for $1,000; Alyssa Kelly — Ohio State University, was recipient of the D. Joseph Hunsaker Scholarship for $1,000; Jennifer Mielke — Saginaw Valley State University was awarded the William N. Rowley Scholarship for $1,000; and Taylor Strout — Armstrong Atlantic State University was awarded the D.J. Wright Scholarship for $1,000.

The Fellowship program was established to encourage and support graduate students and post-­doctoral fellows who are performing risk reduction or health benefit research related to aquatic activities and/or venues such as swimming pools, spas/hot tubs, therapy pools, and waterparks. The NSPF® Fellowship Program awarded $8,000 to two students.

Jodi Jensen, M.A., Public Administration, who is pursuing her Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Management, Hampton University, Hampton, Va., received a fellowship award of $4,000. Ms. Jensen is a second-­time recipient of the fellowship award. She has over 20 years in the aquatics field and has a lifetime love of the water. Ms. Jensen has worked in the public sector in parks and recreation before entering full time into academia. In addition to attaining NSPF Instructor status, she has volunteered on the National Red Cross Advisory Committee for revision of the Lifeguard Training program; she also served as member of the Hygiene Technical Committee for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Model Aquatic Health Code. Her interests include examining attitudes and beliefs towards aquatics by African Americans, particularly young adults. Her experimental investigation would address the huge disparity between African Americans versus Caucasians who swim, and the impact on unintentional drowning rates.

Laura Suppes, who is pursuing a Doctorate degree in Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, was awarded a $4,000 fellowship. Ms. Suppes is a Certified Pool/Spa Operator® certification program graduate, Registered Environmental Health Specialist, and a Master of Public Health. Ms. Suppes is currently conducting research funded by the National Swimming Pool Foundation under the direction of Dr. Kelly Reynolds that aims to develop standardized criteria for studies that explore health effects associated with exposure to aquatic environments. In addition, for part of her dissertation, she will study the correlations among microbial and cyanuric acid concentrates at various pool depths and Acute Gastrointestinal Illness reports by pool users.

Counsilman – Hunsaker Continues Partnership with FINA World Aquatics Convention

Federation Internationale de Natation (FINA), based in Lausanne, Switzerland is the sole worldwide sports organization governing swimming, diving, synchronized swimming, water polo open water swimming and Masters swimming.

FINA has signed a partnership agreement with Counsilman – Hunsaker for the 2nd FINA World Aquatics Convention to be held in Moscow, Russia, October 29 – November 1, 2012.

The FINA World Aquatic Convention is a unique occasion to evaluate and discuss the development of the Aquatic sports across the five continents, and to suggest, by a common exchange of point of view, further ways of progress. We welcome Counsilman – Hunsaker with their strong background in aquatic sport to join us in these conversations.

 

“We are delighted that Counsilman – Hunsaker has agreed to continue their support of the FINA World Aquatics Convention. Counsilman – Hunsaker has a long history as a designer of world class aquatic facilities and their experience will be of tremendous interest to the Convention delegates. Several FINA competitions have been held in Counsilman – Hunsaker designed aquatics facilities and we look forward to working with them at the 2nd FINA World Aquatics Convention”

Dr. Julio C. Maglione, FINA President

 

“Counsilman – Hunsaker has designed over 123 aquatics facilities with Olympic-sized pools, of which 11 have witnessed new world records. Continuing our strong, working relationship with FINA for the 2nd FINA World Aquatics Convention is reflective of the importance Counsilman – Hunsaker places on aquatic competition at the highest levels. We are excited to be a trusted founding partner of such an important world event for the future of competitive aquatics.”

Scot Hunsaker, President Counsilman – Hunsaker

 

For more information online visit: http://aquaticsconvention.fina.org

Fear substantially limits the participation in aquatic activity

Change is  hard. Fear makes change even harder. A study performed by Gallup (n=815) and  presented at the 2008 World Aquatic Health™ Conference by Melon Dash  indicates that 64% of Americans are afraid in deep, open water (lakes, rivers,  ocean,…). Forty six percent are afraid in deep water in pools. Even 39% are  afraid to put their heads under water.

I was talking  to Melon Dash a couple years ago and she said something that has been embedded  in my mind ever since. Melon leads the Miracle Swimming Institute that focuses  on training swim instructors to help fearful adults become swimmers. She said  something like, “When you think you are going to die, you are not thinking  about proper stroke technique.” When my kids were in swim classes, a lot of the  focus was on strokes.  Overcoming change  is already a substantial barrier for most people. Overcoming fear is an even  greater obstacle.

It seems  reasonable to surmise that if an individual is afraid of a specific  environment, it is less likely that they would advocate participating in  activities in that environment or purchasing a swimming pool. If that  individual has influence on purchasing decisions in the family, it is  reasonable to conclude that over half of American households may oppose the  idea of engaging in aquatic activities or investing in a pool or hot tub.  Donate to swim programs that help the fearful like the Miracle  Swimming Institute or S.O.A.P.  (Strategies for Overcoming Aquatic Phobias).  Or, donate to  the Step Into Swim™ Campaign that will raise money for  programs like these and other learn-to-swim programs.

Come learn about these programs at the 2012 World Aquatic Health Conference in Norfolk, VA on October 10-12.   Getting more people in the water benefits everyone!