Category Archives: Industry Mentions

MAHC Recirculation Systems and Filtration

CDC posts the Model Aquatic Health Code’s module for Recirculation Systems and Filtration for public comment with a closing date of October 9, 2013.

To view the latest updates regarding the Model Aquatic Health Code go to www.chh2o.com/MAHC.

The Recirculation Systems and Filtration module was initially released earlier this summer for public comment but has been re-released to encourage further review and feedback.

Health issues related to waterborne diseases as well as exposure to chemicals associated with pool water are increasingly being documented. The Recirculation Systems and Filtration Module is a first step towards improving water quality at aquatic facilities and reducing associated health effects. The Recirculation Systems and Filtration Module contains design and construction requirements that are, unless otherwise specified, applicable only for new or modified construction. New and improved elements include:

  1. More aggressive turnover times and more uniform standards for recirculation system design and operation.
  2. Filter design and operation standards that will promote more effective and efficient filtration.
  3. Requiring water replenishment to dilute out the dissolved contaminants that cannot be removed by pool filters.
  4. Development of a long-term plan to use pool filters for pathogen removal in addition to water clarity in a multiple barrier system that would complement all disinfection processes.
  5. Use of improved flow meters

MAHC Background:

The Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) effort began in February 2005 and the latest round of modules is being published for public comment. The MAHC will have a significant impact on the aquatic industry and we strongly encourage all industry members to take an active role in providing meaningful feedback to develop the best possible result.

The first industry standard was issued in 1958. In the subsequent 50 years, there have been at least 50 different state codes and many independent county codes. What was required in one jurisdiction may be illegal in another. It is clear that this historic approach is not working. Thus, the National Swimming Pool Foundation took a leadership position and provided funding to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) for the creation of the MAHC. The MAHC is intended to transform the patch work of industry codes into a data-driven, knowledge-based, risk reduction effort to prevent disease, injuries and promote healthy water experiences.

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Music Videos: Swimmer Re-mix!

For years musicians have been featuring pools as center pieces for their music videos. The problem is that swimming hasn’t been the focus, it’s been the partying and extravagance being showcased. Recently lifeguards, swimmers, and even pool maintenance professionals have gotten into the mix and have made aquatics the true center piece. Here is a list of my top 5 favorite “swimming videos”. I believe these creative expressions stem from staring at the bottom of a pool for hours upon hours, or maybe it’s breathing chlorine fumes for too long.

 

Splash on em:

Featuring a cast of multi-national Olympian swimmers including Ed Moses, Mike Alexandrov, Max Jaben, Azan AL-Barazi, and Katie Hoff, this is what swimmers do in their off-time.  Filmed at SPLASH in La Mirada, CA this original song shows what swimmers think about while starting at the lane markings on the bottom of a pool.

 

Pool Care Rap Video

How do you make pool care and maintenance interesting, ask Matt Giovanisci.  His original song and video literally “steps” you through how to care for a pool and keep the water “sparkling clean.”

 

Call Me Maybe USA Olympic Swimming Team

Spearheaded by a few key members of the USA Women’s 2012
Olympic Swim Team, this video shows the lighter side of training only weeks
before the London Olympic Games.

 

Harlem Shake: University of Georgia Men’s Swim Team

Remember the Harlem Shake? Well so will University of Georgia’s Men’s Swim Team, indefinitely.  This Harlem Shake video has over 37 MILLION views on YouTube; something’s you can never live down.

 

Lifeguard Style (Gangnam Style Remake)

In September of 2012, 13 lifeguards and their supervisor we fired by the City of El Monte, CA for making “Lifeguard Style,” a spoof of the popular PSY’s Gangnam Style .  The story made national news and eventually after petitions and unwanted publicity, the City re-hired their staff.

 

 

 

 

 

Honorable mention: Fanny Pack Sexy Back

They say mimicry is the ultimate form of flattery.  If that’s true, Justin Timberlake would be proud of these YMCA lifeguards.

 

 

A 3-Year-Old Swimming 50 Meters Twice? Just a “Life Skill” With Video

Note:  Orginally published by Swimming World Magazine.  See link at the bottom for original article.

WATCHING a 3-year-old jump into a pool and splash around the water is nothing new. But to see a child of that age swimming the length of a 50-meter pool twice is a rare sight to behold.

Bruce Wigo, the CEO of the International Swimming Hall of Fame, met the White family at the Hall of Fame complex in Fort Lauderdale and captured this video of 3-year-old Henry White jumping into the pool and swimming 50 meters unassisted. Wigo also talked to the boy’s parents, Eric and Sylvia, about their desire to make the Whites “a swimming family.”

His father, Eric, said this video doesn’t fully encapsulate how much his son enjoys the water. The parents have dozens of videos of Henry showing no fear as he climbs to the three-meter springboard and jumps off. The love of the sport was passed down from the mother to her children, the oldest of whom is 5-year-old Erica. Olivia, still a toddler, is likely to join her older siblings into the pool soon.

“Nurturing plays a big part, but it’s also genetics,” Eric White told Swimming World of his children’s affinity for the pool. “We started swimming as a family in March 2011, but before that when my wife would bathe the kids, she would tell them, ‘kick, kick, kick’ while they were in the bathtub. When they transitioned to the pool, it was nothing more than ‘kick, kick, kick.'”

Discussion of Henry’s ability to swim the length of the pool will be inevitably coupled with discussion of his skin color, and Eric White is fine with that. In an age where organizations such as USA Swimming and ISHOF are implementing programs to reduce drowning rates among minority children and bring more minorities into the sport, White knows his son could be viewed as an inspiration to other black children around the world.

“You can’t ignore the history of the sport,” White said. “If my kids are fortunate to compete at high levels, I’d be proud of them as a parent, and if they can bring along kids that look like them, I’d be proud of that, too.”

Henry was recently a part of the Black Heritage Meet in Raleigh, S.C., where he was the youngest competitor and completed a 25-yard freestyle in 1:19.38. Obviously, times are not important at this point in Henry’s swimming career, and Eric White says a love and familiarity with the water is what makes him happiest.

“First and foremost,” he says, “it’s a life skill.”

YouTube Video at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2R5BG4Tz7A

Original Article at : http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/usa/34728.asp

NSF and UV – Changes throught the years

NSF (National Sanitation Foundation) was founded in 1944 to standardize sanitation and food safety requirements. Today, it has evolved into an accredited, independent third party certification body that tests and certifies products to verify that they meet public health and safety standards. The NSF is made up of many different divisions covering a wide range of topics, including the Water Division which covers swimming pools and spas.

Third party certification helps both the consumers as well as the manufacturers by reviewing certain processes and establishing standards and guidelines to ensure that a product complies with specific standards for safety, quality and performance. It makes for a level playing field for all parties involved.

In the swimming pool industry specifically, there have been many changes to local codes and national codes and standards over the years. In addition, new products are introduced daily claiming to be the “next best thing” for your pool. The NSF has modified itself to also keep up with these evolving codes and ever changing technologies that come to the market place.  All products should certainly be held to the standards of the NSF at a minimum.  If they pass the approval of NSF, they will proudly display that on their label.

Some of the major milestones that have affected UV systems in the swimming pool industry include:

NSF 2001: This called for disinfection efficacy for Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  At the time, it seemed appropriate for pools. But with chlorine based chemicals used as primary sanitizers, certain bugs became more and more chlorine resistant causing the NSF to change their standard.

NSF 2010: This increased the standard to include the inactivation of Cryptosporidium as well as the dose determination that is required to complete this process.  UV is based primarily on a dosing system, similar to that of the medical profession.  There is a certain dose of antibiotics that is needed for certain infections.  Just like a doctor carefully calculates the right medication and dosage to treat an illness, there is a specific science behind the dosing of UV.  A dose of 12 mJ/cm2 is needed to achieve a 3 log reduction of Crypto, but that same dose is ineffective against HIV for example.  So a standard had to be implemented by NSF for the UV systems.

NSF 2012: This standard took the UV a final step to include life testing, operating temperature, cleanability, design pressure, flowmeter, performance indication, operation and installation instructions, drawings and parts lists, disinfection efficacy, as well as valve and component identification.

As you can see by the changes in the NSF guidelines, there will certainly be more to follow in the coming years.  We as aquatics professionals need to be aware of these changes and keep our customers educated to the best of our ability.  The more we can educate our customers, the easier it will be to stay ahead of these changes.

Are Aquatic Wheel Chairs Flawed?

The Americans with Disabilities Act Regulations for public swimming pools define two primary means of access for aquatic facilities. These are swimming pool lifts and sloped entries.

 

The reason that these two means of access are designated as primary is that they can provide assistance to a wider variety of users then the secondary means of access. The secondary means of access are transfer walls, transfer systems, and accessible stairs.

 

One thing to keep in mind when selecting a primary means of access for a swimming pool is the ability of potential swimmers to use the selected means of access independently. The primary goal of the ADA is to create an environment where people with disabilities can independently participate in society. This is why one of the requirements for swimming pool lifts is that they be capable of independent operation. Sloped entries are a primary means of access, and serve as an excellent way to enter and exit a pool for ambulatory swimmers. Sloped entries are much safer than either steps or stairs, especially for seniors.

 

Some wheelchair users, however, may have a difficult time trying to independently enter a swimming pool using a sloped entry. The combination of the slope plus the added buoyancy and friction created by the water, make independently exiting a pool a real challenge for wheelchair users. Additionally, the design of most aquatic wheelchairs compounds the problem, by creating additional instability.

 

Please see the attached two videos that demonstrate the problems discussed in the previous paragraph. The first video shows the general problems with trying to independently use a wheelchair on a sloped entry. The second video was shot to present a better designed aquatic wheelchair. The second video was shot while the wheelchair was in its design phase.

 

In conclusion, sloped entries are wonderful means of access for ambulatory swimmers.  However, keep in mind who will be using this means of access, as it may not be the optimal way for some wheelchair users to get into a pool.